Is doomsday preppers a real show?

Every week, the National Geographic Doomsday Preppers program features a handful of Americans who are convinced that the world will soon come to an end. They accumulate thousands of pounds of food with tons of weapons and ammunition as they wait for the end of the world as we know it.

Is doomsday preppers a real show?

Every week, the National Geographic Doomsday Preppers program features a handful of Americans who are convinced that the world will soon come to an end. They accumulate thousands of pounds of food with tons of weapons and ammunition as they wait for the end of the world as we know it. You might make fun of people on shows like Doomsday Preppers, but legitimate prep groups like the American Preppers Network are experiencing explosive growth: every day they add an average of 100 new members from countries around the world. With no shortage of potential content and a legion of adoring fans, Doomsday Preppers should have been prepared to become the next staple of block programming.

DOOMSDAY PREPPERS is a reality show that features people from all walks of life preparing for what they think will be the end of the world. At the end of each episode, NatGeo experts gave each preparer a score of 1 to 100 rating the quality and likely effectiveness of their proper pre-planning. The last nail in the coffin came in the form of Sandy Hook shooter Adama Lanza, who mentioned that he considered himself a doomsday preparer. After highlighting the key elements of their plans, program experts rank their readiness for doomsday and estimate how long they will initially survive based on their preparations so far.

The “experts” of NatGeo (I add scary quotes because their credentials are never explained) say how prepared the preparers are for the doomsday scenario. Doomsday Preppers is about those who think that the apocalypse, one way or another, is on its way and soon. And confusion over James Yeager's rhetoric led to a widespread campaign against Doomsday Preparers. Parents need to know that the reality series Doomsday Preppers features people who are planning and developing ways to survive the end of the world.

Reports had recently emerged that Adama Lanza, the Sandy Hook gunman, had been a devoted survivor and self-described doomsday preparer. That dizzy feeling worsens when you start to notice how many of the people at Doomsday Preppers seem to suffer from real psychological problems, possibly rooted in personal trauma. If you just know that the preparation comes from the Doomsday Preppers program, you most likely think that the preparers are a bunch of militia guys with a lot of weapons and distrust of the big government. The show cleverly borrows from VH1's old Pop-Up Video, with small boxes appearing on the screen contradicting the claims made by preparers while explaining their fears, making it easier for viewers to dismiss preparers as fools and laugh at their nonsense.

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